NEW YORK, NEW YORK - JULY 24: People sit and have a picnic in Washington Square Park during a heat wave on July 24, 2022 in New York City. The five boroughs of New York City are under a heat advisory until 8 PM on July 24th according to the US National Weather Service. Much of the East Coast is experiencing higher than usual temperatures as a heat wave moves through the area forcing residents into parks, pools and beaches to escape the heat. (Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images)

Why Americans are Spending Less Time with Friends — And What to do About it

WBUR On Point

Daniel A. Cox December 20, 2022

A full work week. Hours on housework, yard work, time spent with your kids or partner. Then there’s all the time we spend online. Where is the time for friends? Today, On Point: Declining time with friends, increasing loneliness. We hear what to do about Americans’ lost connections.

Four cartoon black hanging lamps on a blue background, one light bulb is not working.

Women are More Likely to Make Friends at Work than Men. Here’s Why that Matters

Deseret News

Daniel A. Cox, Brent Orrell December 16, 2022

Research shows that the more friends we have, the less likely we are to be depressed or anxious, and work friendships boost productivity and worker retention

At Orange Bowl Stadium, immigrants demonstrate their patriotism during what could be the largest naturalization ceremony in American history. c. 1984 (GettyImages).

How Hispanic Americans Think About Work and Identity

The Bulwark

Brent Orrell November 18, 2022

If we want to understand the evolving role of Hispanic Americans in American culture and politics, one useful on-ramp is studying Hispanics in the workplace.

The New Workplace Gender Imbalance: Social Capital and Job Satisfaction

The Bulwark

Daniel A. Cox, Brent Orrell, Jessie Wall October 31, 2022

New data suggests gender and education are the difference between liking and loving your job. But there’s a price to be paid.

Gen Z at a Roe vs. Wade protest

There’s A New Age Gap On Abortion Rights

FiveThirtyEight

Daniel A. Cox June 1, 2022

Americans’ views on abortion have been relatively consistent for years despite massive demographic changes, social upheaval and shifting perspectives on sexuality. But that may be about to change.

Will Abortion Redefine the 2022 Elections?

Smerconish

Daniel A. Cox May 12, 2022

Democratic losses in November seem predestined. For many political observers, the only question left is how bad will it get?

A young woman with curly blond hair stands alone on a red and green athletic court.

Gen Z is the Loneliest Generation — and It’s Their Parents Fault

Insider

Daniel A. Cox April 11, 2022

Gen Z is the most accomplished generation, but new data show they missed out on fun and family, leaving them more adrift than previous generations.

An African American teenager male attending church.

Stop Blaming Young People for Leaving Religion

National Review

Daniel A. Cox April 10, 2022

Much of the decline in current religious commitments can be traced back to the way young adults have been raised.

For Gen Z, Religious Pluralism Will Require Bridging the Religious-Secular Divide

The Aspen Institute

Daniel A. Cox April 5, 2022

For Generation Z, American religious life has been defined by its diversity. And religious pluralism has been as much practice as principle.

A black and white photo of a man and woman sitting back-to-back in a train car.

We Live in a Nation of Strangers. That Needs to Change

Deseret News

Daniel A. Cox March 13, 2022

Diversity is not the source of our current problems; our troubling incuriosity about our neighbors is driving disconnection.

Survey Reports

Red leather-bound Qur'an on a wooden table with prayer beads and a light blue surgical mask draped over top.

Lindsey Witt-Swanson, Jennifer Benz, Daniel A. Cox
January 5, 2023

Faith After the Pandemic: How COVID-19 Changed American Religion

The Survey Center on American Life at AEI teamed up with researchers at NORC at the University of Chicago to measure religious affiliation and attendance both before the pandemic (2018 to March 2020) and again in spring 2022, revealing who remained at the pews, who returned to the pews, and who left.

Brent Orrell, Daniel A. Cox, Jessie Wall
October 25, 2022

The Social Workplace: Social Capital, Human Dignity, and Work in America

Why is work, more often than not, the center of life for Americans? Explore the social dimension of work and the role it plays in building human connections and strengthening social capital.

Karlyn Bowman, Daniel A. Cox
October 4, 2022

Gender, Generation and Abortion: Shifting Politics and Perspectives After Roe

Three months after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the issue of abortion continues to garner widespread public attention.

Daniel A. Cox
July 28, 2022

The Democratic Party’s Transformation: More Diverse, Educated, and Liberal but Less Religious

The Democratic party has experienced a lot if change in recent years, where is this change most prominent in the days leading up to 2022 midterms?