Why Increasing COVID-19 Fatalities May Not Sway the Unvaccinated

Daniel A. Cox September 30, 2021

With nearly 700,000 Americans now dead from COVID-19, the US has reached yet another grim milestone. One in five hundred Americans have died from COVID-19. Unvaccinated Americans are suffering the vast majority of serious illnesses and deaths—in fact they are 11 times more likely to die from a COVID-19 infection. And it begs the question: As the unvaccinated see their friends and family members succumb to the disease, will it finally convince them to get vaccinated?

So far, the answer seems to be no. An Ipsos survey from early September shows that 39 percent of Americans know someone who died from COVID-19. But vaccination rates among Americans who know someone who died are only marginally higher than the rates among those who do not. What’s more, if you take education and political affiliation into account, knowing someone who has died from COVID-19 has no significant impact on the likelihood of being vaccinated.

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Survey Reports

bridge between college graduates and those without a degree

Daniel A. Cox
December 13, 2021

The college connection: The education divide in American social and community life

The 2021 American Community Life Survey illuminates the growing social divide between Americans with college educations and those without.

An illustration of the main street of a small town. There is a market, library, cafe, gym, and restaurant. People are walking on the sidewalk, are inside the buildings, and there is a car going down the street.

Daniel A. Cox, Ryan Streeter, Samuel J. Abrams, Beatrice Lee, Dana Popky
October 20, 2021

Public places and commercial spaces: How neighborhood amenities foster trust and connection in American communities

The 2021 American Community Life Survey illuminates the state of communities in America and documents some of the hidden benefits neighborhoods offer to residents.

Daniel A. Cox, Nat Malkus
September 22, 2021

Controversy and Consensus: Perspectives on Race, Religion, and COVID-19 in Public Schools

The August 2021 American Perspectives Survey reveals surprising consensus and controversy on American attitudes towards COVID-19, race, and religion in public schools.

A help wanted sign is posted at a taco stand in Solana Beach, California, U.S., July 17, 2017.

Brent Orrell, Daniel A. Cox
July 15, 2021

The great American jobs reshuffle

The June 2021 American Perspectives Survey (APS) finds that people’s work arrangements and preferences, unemployment experiences, and career aspirations are changing as workers navigate the new post-pandemic labor market.

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