Yes, You Should Talk Politics with Your Family Over Thanksgiving

Daniel A. Cox November 24, 2021

An overhead picture of a long, dimly-lit table set for Thanksgiving dinner. People sit at the table.

Every year, the specter of political discord looms over the holidays. But despite the widespread attention it garners, few Americans report fighting over politics at the dinner table. This year, most of us are seeking to strenuously avoid political topics at family get-togethers. This is a mistake. Americans are likely tired of talking about politics. But we should. In fact, we should talk about politics a lot more than we do.

Our problem is not that we have become too obsessed with politics. Rather, it’s who we choose to discuss politics with that is the problem. Too many of us only talk politics with people who think as we do. I wrote about this phenomenon last year, suggesting that “Democrats And Republicans Should Argue More – Not Less.” Today, more than half of Democrats and Republicans have no close connection to someone with different political views. As a result, we trust each other less, hate each other more, and are wildly misinformed about what the other side actually thinks.

Continue reading on American Storylines

Survey Reports

bridge between college graduates and those without a degree

Daniel A. Cox
December 13, 2021

The college connection: The education divide in American social and community life

The 2021 American Community Life Survey illuminates the growing social divide between Americans with college educations and those without.

An illustration of the main street of a small town. There is a market, library, cafe, gym, and restaurant. People are walking on the sidewalk, are inside the buildings, and there is a car going down the street.

Daniel A. Cox, Ryan Streeter, Samuel J. Abrams, Beatrice Lee, Dana Popky
October 20, 2021

Public places and commercial spaces: How neighborhood amenities foster trust and connection in American communities

The 2021 American Community Life Survey illuminates the state of communities in America and documents some of the hidden benefits neighborhoods offer to residents.

Daniel A. Cox, Nat Malkus
September 22, 2021

Controversy and Consensus: Perspectives on Race, Religion, and COVID-19 in Public Schools

The August 2021 American Perspectives Survey reveals surprising consensus and controversy on American attitudes towards COVID-19, race, and religion in public schools.

A help wanted sign is posted at a taco stand in Solana Beach, California, U.S., July 17, 2017.

Brent Orrell, Daniel A. Cox
July 15, 2021

The great American jobs reshuffle

The June 2021 American Perspectives Survey (APS) finds that people’s work arrangements and preferences, unemployment experiences, and career aspirations are changing as workers navigate the new post-pandemic labor market.

Sign up today for AMERICAN STORYLINES: A newsletter by Daniel A. Cox