Blog

The benefits of going to a place “where everyone knows your name”

Daniel A. Cox, Jacqueline Clemence November 23, 2020

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, these community spaces look a little different right now. Coffee shops, restaurants, and parks have more importance than ever in connecting us to our community and to the world outside our homes. Continue Reading →

Survey report

Hopes and challenges for community and civic life: Perspectives from the nation and Indiana

Daniel A. Cox, Karlyn Bowman, Jacqueline Clemence November 18, 2020

The coronavirus outbreak has created tensions between urban Americans hit harder by the virus and small towns and rural communities. Despite these disparities, recently released surveys find that before coronavirus, Americans express many of the same ideas and priorities regarding their communities, revealing we may not be as divided as one might think. Continue Reading →

Survey report

Hardship, anxiety, and optimism: Racial and partisan disparities in Americans’ response to COVID-19

Daniel A. Cox June 16, 2020

In the COVID-19 and American Life Survey, most Americans do not think life will return to normal until 2021. Financial hardships have hit many households, but minorities have been disproportionately affected by the coronavirus pandemic. Continue Reading →

Blog

The urban-rural divide over the coronavirus outbreak

Daniel A. Cox, Jacqueline Clemence April 16, 2020

Despite clear partisan gaps in views about the coronavirus outbreak, where Americans live is shaping how they respond to it. Continue Reading →

Survey report

A loneliness epidemic? How marriage, religion, and mobility explain the generation gap in loneliness

Daniel A. Cox, Ryan Streeter September 26, 2019

Conventional wisdom holds that loneliness is a serious problem in America today. Yes data from the Survey on Community and Society (SCS) suggest that such characterizations of loneliness are overblown and possibly wrong. Continue Reading →

Blog

Are Americans who attend neighborhood churches better off?

Daniel A. Cox June 25, 2019

Beyond cutting down commute times and saving on gas there is no obvious benefit to attending religious services close to home. Continue Reading →

Survey report

The importance of place: Neighborhood amenities as a source of social connection and trust

Daniel A. Cox, Ryan Streeter May 20, 2019

Place matters. When given a choice, most people prefer to live close to the basics of community life—schools, stores, parks, and restaurants. Continue Reading →

Survey Reports

Daniel A. Cox
March 4, 2021

Social isolation and community disconnection are not spurring conspiracy theories

New analysis from the January 2021 American Perspectives Survey shows that having an active social life and regular engagement with people in your neighborhood does not inoculate against believing in conspiracies. Continue Reading →

Daniel A. Cox
February 11, 2021

After the ballots are counted: Conspiracies, political violence, and American exceptionalism

The January 2021 American Perspectives Survey looks at post-election sentiments, beliefs in conspiracies, attitudes toward political violence, political segregation, and general feelings toward the United States. Continue Reading →

Daniel A. Cox
December 15, 2020

Religious diversity and change in American social networks: How our social connections shape religious beliefs and behavior

New analysis explores the degree to which Americans’ religious networks are composed largely of those with similar beliefs and affiliations or those that are more diverse. It also explores how religious diversity among our close personal relationships serves to structure religious behavior and belief. Continue Reading →

Daniel A. Cox, Karlyn Bowman
December 9, 2020

A turning point? Americans grapple with COVID-19 amid enduring partisan and racial divisions

The November 2020 APS explores how Americans are grappling with COVID-19 amid soaring numbers of infections, finding that more Americans say they would get a free, FDA-approved vaccine, but large partisan divisions persist. It also challenges the “shy Trump voter” hypothesis, offering possible explanations for Trump’s increased support among non-white voters.    Continue Reading →