A group adults sit in a backyard while one of them barbeques.
Commentary

Suburbs are not less social than cities

Samuel J. Abrams June 8, 2021

Many believe there are meaningful differences in sociability based on where Americans reside. New data from AEI’s Survey Center on American Life counters this narrative and finds little difference in the social lives of urbanites, suburbanites, and their rural counterparts.   Continue Reading →

Blog

What does it mean to be a best friend?

Daniel A. Cox June 8, 2021

American friendships have come under considerable stress over the past year, but even in the wake of a global pandemic, most Americans still have at least one close friend. In fact, 87 percent of Americans have one or more close friends. These close friendships are critical to our wellbeing. Americans who have a close friendship Continue Reading →

3 friends having coffee time on a terrace
Survey report

The state of American friendship: Change, challenges, and loss

Daniel A. Cox June 8, 2021

The May 2021 American Perspectives Survey finds that Americans report having fewer close friendships than they once did, talking to their friends less often, and relying less on their friends for personal support. Continue Reading →

Commentary

Support for political violence among Americans is on the rise. It’s a grim warning about America’s political future.

Daniel A. Cox March 26, 2021

In the wake of the Capitol uprising, we have been forced to reckon with the uncomfortable truth that political violence is no longer a theoretical concern. Continue Reading →

Blog

Few Americans are confident in American democracy, but younger Americans are especially skeptical

Daniel A. Cox, Samantha Goldstein March 8, 2021

If governments can effectively administer the COVID-19 vaccine and deliver economic support, it will go a long way in demonstrating that even if government is clunky and the results imperfect, the institutions of democratic governance can work. Continue Reading →

Survey report

Social isolation and community disconnection are not spurring conspiracy theories

Daniel A. Cox March 4, 2021

New analysis from the January 2021 American Perspectives Survey shows that having an active social life and regular engagement with people in your neighborhood does not inoculate against believing in conspiracies. Continue Reading →

Blog

When it comes to conspiracy theories, education matters

Daniel A. Cox, Jacqueline Clemence February 26, 2021

Educational attainment is closely associated with belief in conspiracy theories. However, education appears to matter more for Republicans than Democrats. Continue Reading →

Blog

Rise of conspiracies reveals an evangelical divide in the GOP

Daniel A. Cox February 12, 2021

Evangelical Christian Republicans are more likely to embrace conspiracy theories. One explanation? Their affinity to Trump. Continue Reading →

Survey report

After the ballots are counted: Conspiracies, political violence, and American exceptionalism

Daniel A. Cox February 11, 2021

The January 2021 American Perspectives Survey looks at post-election sentiments, beliefs in conspiracies, attitudes toward political violence, political segregation, and general feelings toward the United States. Continue Reading →

Blog

Older Americans support getting vaccinated regardless of their politics or the perceived threat of COVID-19

Daniel A. Cox, Samantha Goldstein January 8, 2021

As the US ramps up vaccinations, political identity is important in predicting the behavior of younger Americans. Continue Reading →

Survey Reports

3 friends having coffee time on a terrace

Daniel A. Cox
June 8, 2021

The state of American friendship: Change, challenges, and loss

The May 2021 American Perspectives Survey finds that Americans report having fewer close friendships than they once did, talking to their friends less often, and relying less on their friends for personal support. Continue Reading →

Daniel A. Cox
March 4, 2021

Social isolation and community disconnection are not spurring conspiracy theories

New analysis from the January 2021 American Perspectives Survey shows that having an active social life and regular engagement with people in your neighborhood does not inoculate against believing in conspiracies. Continue Reading →

Daniel A. Cox
February 11, 2021

After the ballots are counted: Conspiracies, political violence, and American exceptionalism

The January 2021 American Perspectives Survey looks at post-election sentiments, beliefs in conspiracies, attitudes toward political violence, political segregation, and general feelings toward the United States. Continue Reading →

Daniel A. Cox
December 15, 2020

Religious diversity and change in American social networks: How our social connections shape religious beliefs and behavior

New analysis explores the degree to which Americans’ religious networks are composed largely of those with similar beliefs and affiliations or those that are more diverse. It also explores how religious diversity among our close personal relationships serves to structure religious behavior and belief. Continue Reading →