Newsletter

Are Americans Hopelessly Divided Over Politics?

Daniel A. Cox August 18, 2022

Many believe America is more polarized than it actually is. What does the data show and how can we avoid this? Continue Reading →

Newsletter

Will a New Generation of Young People Leave Religion Over Abortion?

Daniel A. Cox August 4, 2022

Young people are leaving religion at a large scale. Could abortion be a contributing factor? Continue Reading →

Newsletter

Is the GOP Becoming a Racially Diverse Party?

Daniel A. Cox July 21, 2022

While some have thought the GOP was gaining support from racial minorities, in reality their demographics have not changed much in the last few decades. Continue Reading →

Obama with supporters
Newsletter

Are Millennials Becoming More Conservative?

Daniel A. Cox July 7, 2022

The oldest millennials are now in their early 40s, with many of them married and starting families. But what does this mean for their politics? Continue Reading →

Woman is getting bored in restaurant while her boyfriend is talking on the phone.
Newsletter

The Confidence Trap

Daniel A. Cox June 23, 2022

More young men are struggling with anxiety and self-doubt, but in dating are too often told they need to be confident. Continue Reading →

Newsletter

The Political Gender Gap is Exploding

Daniel A. Cox June 9, 2022

There’s a growing political rift between young men and women in the US today. Continue Reading →

Newsletter

The Problem With Polling Abortion

Daniel A. Cox May 12, 2022

This is difficult for me to admit as someone who makes a living conducting and analyzing polls, but we might need to think hard about what polls are really contributing to the public debate on abortion.   Polls play a crucial role in our debates over public policy. They reveal to journalists, elected officials, and Continue Reading →

A student walks through an empty school hallway with orange walls.
Newsletter

In Seeking to Stand Out, Gen Z Has Become the Loneliest Generation

Daniel A. Cox April 14, 2022

If you shouted out your name in public, how many people do you think would respond? If you have a common name—Daniel for example—chances are you might get some people to turn around. But sharing your name with multiple classmates, friends, or co-workers is an experience that’s becoming much less common. Parents are increasingly prioritizing Continue Reading →

Newsletter

What Might NASA’s New Space Telescope Mean for Religion?

Daniel A. Cox March 31, 2022

We are about to enter the golden age of space exploration. If you’re not a space nerd, this may be news to you, but NASA has embarked on one of the most ambitious projects in a generation. On December 25, 2021, NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope was launched into space. A successor to the immensely successful Continue Reading →

A black and white picture of single man sitting on a bench looking distraught.
Newsletter

Why Religion Matters More for Working Class Men

Daniel A. Cox March 17, 2022

Americans have become increasingly disconnected from each other. We join fewer organizations, spend less time with our neighbors, and have fewer friends than we did in the recent past. Working-class men have been especially hard-hit by this social recession. They’re more likely to experience social dislocation and alienation and the raft of social, psychological, and personal health problems that come Continue Reading →

Survey Reports

Red leather-bound Qur'an on a wooden table with prayer beads and a light blue surgical mask draped over top.

Lindsey Witt-Swanson, Jennifer Benz, Daniel A. Cox
January 5, 2023

Faith After the Pandemic: How COVID-19 Changed American Religion

The Survey Center on American Life at AEI teamed up with researchers at NORC at the University of Chicago to measure religious affiliation and attendance both before the pandemic (2018 to March 2020) and again in spring 2022, revealing who remained at the pews, who returned to the pews, and who left.

Brent Orrell, Daniel A. Cox, Jessie Wall
October 25, 2022

The Social Workplace: Social Capital, Human Dignity, and Work in America

Why is work, more often than not, the center of life for Americans? Explore the social dimension of work and the role it plays in building human connections and strengthening social capital.

Karlyn Bowman, Daniel A. Cox
October 4, 2022

Gender, Generation and Abortion: Shifting Politics and Perspectives After Roe

Three months after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the issue of abortion continues to garner widespread public attention.

Daniel A. Cox
July 28, 2022

The Democratic Party’s Transformation: More Diverse, Educated, and Liberal but Less Religious

The Democratic party has experienced a lot if change in recent years, where is this change most prominent in the days leading up to 2022 midterms?