A Caucasian mother embraces her child on the school yard in front of a yellow school bus.
Blog

Should teachers or parents have more influence over education decisions?

Karlyn Bowman October 12, 2021

The August 2021 American Perspectives Survey explores how much say parents and partisans believe parents, teachers, and legislators should have in deciding what is taught in public schools. Continue Reading →

Commentary

Biden’s push for big government solutions is popular now — but it could backfire

Daniel A. Cox May 5, 2021

In the wake of a once-in-a-generation pandemic that has required sustained national intervention and leadership, Americans may be coming around to the benefits of big government. Continue Reading →

Blog

For black voters, friends and family may be a critical link to the Democratic Party

Daniel A. Cox April 2, 2021

With high turnout in the 2020 election, black voters appear poised to remain a critical constituency in the Democratic Party. But their strong support for Democratic candidates and continued political involvement is a function of their social circumstances. Continue Reading →

Blog

Most Asian Americans believe their community experiences a lot of discrimination in the US

Daniel A. Cox, Jacqueline Clemence March 22, 2021

The rising tide of violence against Asian Americans during the COVID-19 pandemic has brought renewed attention to Asian Americans’ experiences of discrimination in the US. Often thought to experience less discrimination, the survey shows that Asian Americans do not view their experiences in the same way. Continue Reading →

Blog

Few Americans are confident in American democracy, but younger Americans are especially skeptical

Daniel A. Cox, Samantha Goldstein March 8, 2021

If governments can effectively administer the COVID-19 vaccine and deliver economic support, it will go a long way in demonstrating that even if government is clunky and the results imperfect, the institutions of democratic governance can work. Continue Reading →

Survey report

Social isolation and community disconnection are not spurring conspiracy theories

Daniel A. Cox March 4, 2021

New analysis from the January 2021 American Perspectives Survey shows that having an active social life and regular engagement with people in your neighborhood does not inoculate against believing in conspiracies. Continue Reading →

Blog

When it comes to conspiracy theories, education matters

Daniel A. Cox, Jacqueline Clemence February 26, 2021

Educational attainment is closely associated with belief in conspiracy theories. However, education appears to matter more for Republicans than Democrats. Continue Reading →

Survey report

After the ballots are counted: Conspiracies, political violence, and American exceptionalism

Daniel A. Cox February 11, 2021

The January 2021 American Perspectives Survey looks at post-election sentiments, beliefs in conspiracies, attitudes toward political violence, political segregation, and general feelings toward the United States. Continue Reading →

Blog

If you have a lot of friends, you’re probably more active in politics

Daniel A. Cox, Jacqueline Clemence February 8, 2021

Having a robust network of friends and family may encourage us to become more active in civic and political life. Continue Reading →

Survey report

A turning point? Americans grapple with COVID-19 amid enduring partisan and racial divisions

Daniel A. Cox, Karlyn Bowman December 9, 2020

The November 2020 APS explores how Americans are grappling with COVID-19 amid soaring numbers of infections, finding that more Americans say they would get a free, FDA-approved vaccine, but large partisan divisions persist. It also challenges the “shy Trump voter” hypothesis, offering possible explanations for Trump’s increased support among non-white voters.    Continue Reading →

Survey Reports

An illustration of the main street of a small town. There is a market, library, cafe, gym, and restaurant. People are walking on the sidewalk, are inside the buildings, and there is a car going down the street.

Daniel A. Cox, Ryan Streeter, Samuel J. Abrams, Beatrice Lee, Dana Popky
October 20, 2021

Public places and commercial spaces: How neighborhood amenities foster trust and connection in American communities

The 2021 American Community Life Survey illuminates the state of communities in America and documents some of the hidden benefits neighborhoods offer to residents. Continue Reading →

Daniel A. Cox, Nat Malkus
September 22, 2021

Controversy and Consensus: Perspectives on Race, Religion, and COVID-19 in Public Schools

The August 2021 American Perspectives Survey reveals surprising consensus and controversy on American attitudes towards COVID-19, race, and religion in public schools. Continue Reading →

A help wanted sign is posted at a taco stand in Solana Beach, California, U.S., July 17, 2017.

Brent Orrell, Daniel A. Cox
July 15, 2021

The great American jobs reshuffle

The June 2021 American Perspectives Survey (APS) finds that people’s work arrangements and preferences, unemployment experiences, and career aspirations are changing as workers navigate the new post-pandemic labor market. Continue Reading →

3 friends having coffee time on a terrace

Daniel A. Cox
June 8, 2021

The state of American friendship: Change, challenges, and loss

The May 2021 American Perspectives Survey finds that Americans report having fewer close friendships than they once did, talking to their friends less often, and relying less on their friends for personal support. Continue Reading →

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