Blog

For black voters, friends and family may be a critical link to the Democratic Party

Daniel A. Cox April 2, 2021

With high turnout in the 2020 election, black voters appear poised to remain a critical constituency in the Democratic Party. But their strong support for Democratic candidates and continued political involvement is a function of their social circumstances. Continue Reading →

Blog

Holiday spending in 2020

Karlyn Bowman, Jacqueline Clemence December 17, 2020

The holidays look different this year. In addition to traveling less, having smaller gatherings, and gathering virtually, Americans are also altering their spending habits. Continue Reading →

Survey report

A turning point? Americans grapple with COVID-19 amid enduring partisan and racial divisions

Daniel A. Cox, Karlyn Bowman December 9, 2020

The November 2020 APS explores how Americans are grappling with COVID-19 amid soaring numbers of infections, finding that more Americans say they would get a free, FDA-approved vaccine, but large partisan divisions persist. It also challenges the “shy Trump voter” hypothesis, offering possible explanations for Trump’s increased support among non-white voters.    Continue Reading →

Socially distant: How our divided social networks explain our politics

Daniel A. Cox, Ryan Streeter, Samuel J. Abrams, Jacqueline Clemence September 30, 2020

The American National Social Network Survey is designed to help us understand how the nature of personal networks and relationships conditions personal behavior and influences decisions. Continue Reading →

Survey report

STEM perspectives: Attitudes, opportunities, and barriers in America’s STEM workforce

Daniel A. Cox July 15, 2020

In a survey of STEM graduates, our scholars explore opinions of the STEM field, career satisfaction, and why some STEM degree holders have exited the field. Continue Reading →

Commentary

Many white Americans are ready to reopen the economy. Black Americans aren’t.

Daniel A. Cox, Amelia Thomson-DeVeaux June 16, 2020

Not all Americans are anxious for businesses to reopen. In fact, there is a fairly stark divide among white, black and Hispanic Americans on the subject. Continue Reading →

Survey report

Hardship, anxiety, and optimism: Racial and partisan disparities in Americans’ response to COVID-19

Daniel A. Cox June 16, 2020

In the COVID-19 and American Life Survey, most Americans do not think life will return to normal until 2021. Financial hardships have hit many households, but minorities have been disproportionately affected by the coronavirus pandemic. Continue Reading →

Survey Reports

Daniel A. Cox, Nat Malkus
September 22, 2021

Controversy and Consensus: Perspectives on Race, Religion, and COVID-19 in Public Schools

The August 2021 American Perspectives Survey reveals surprising consensus and controversy on American attitudes towards COVID-19, race, and religion in public schools. Continue Reading →

A help wanted sign is posted at a taco stand in Solana Beach, California, U.S., July 17, 2017.

Brent Orrell, Daniel A. Cox
July 15, 2021

The great American jobs reshuffle

The June 2021 American Perspectives Survey (APS) finds that people’s work arrangements and preferences, unemployment experiences, and career aspirations are changing as workers navigate the new post-pandemic labor market. Continue Reading →

3 friends having coffee time on a terrace

Daniel A. Cox
June 8, 2021

The state of American friendship: Change, challenges, and loss

The May 2021 American Perspectives Survey finds that Americans report having fewer close friendships than they once did, talking to their friends less often, and relying less on their friends for personal support. Continue Reading →

Daniel A. Cox
March 4, 2021

Social isolation and community disconnection are not spurring conspiracy theories

New analysis from the January 2021 American Perspectives Survey shows that having an active social life and regular engagement with people in your neighborhood does not inoculate against believing in conspiracies. Continue Reading →