A black and white photo of a man and woman sitting back-to-back in a train car.
Commentary

We Live in a Nation of Strangers. That Needs to Change

Daniel A. Cox March 13, 2022

Diversity is not the source of our current problems; our troubling incuriosity about our neighbors is driving disconnection. Continue Reading →

Photo of main street, Grass Valley California
Blog

Diversity and Disconnection

Daniel A. Cox, Beatrice Lee, Dana Popky March 1, 2022

Americans who live in areas packed with neighborhood amenities tend to have a more diverse set of friends and acquaintances. Continue Reading →

bridge between college graduates and those without a degree
Survey report

The College Connection: The Education Divide in American Social and Community Life

Daniel A. Cox December 13, 2021

Despite concerns about rising student debt, the economic value of a college education has never been clearer. College graduates are more socially connected, civically engaged, and active in their communities. College graduates have more extensive systems of social support, a larger number of close friends, and feel lonely and isolated less often than those without a degree. Continue Reading →

Photo of a crowd of people
Blog

Some of My Best Friends

Daniel A. Cox April 16, 2021

Despite growing diversity in the US, few Americans have close ties to members of minority religious and racial groups. Continue Reading →

Photo of four women sitting down in line to vote.
Blog

For Black Voters, Friends and Family May be a Critical Link to the Democratic Party

Daniel A. Cox April 2, 2021

With high turnout in the 2020 election, black voters appear poised to remain a critical constituency in the Democratic Party. But their strong support for Democratic candidates and continued political involvement is a function of their social circumstances. Continue Reading →

Photo of a girl holding a sign that says "Stop Asian Hate"
Blog

Most Asian Americans Believe Their Community Experiences a lot of discrimination in the US

Daniel A. Cox, Jacqueline Clemence March 22, 2021

The rising tide of violence against Asian Americans during the COVID-19 pandemic has brought renewed attention to Asian Americans’ experiences of discrimination in the US. Often thought to experience less discrimination, the survey shows that Asian Americans do not view their experiences in the same way. Continue Reading →

Photo of older women participating in a climate change protest
Blog

If You Have a Lot of Friends, You’re Probably More Active in Politics

Daniel A. Cox, Jacqueline Clemence February 8, 2021

Having a robust network of friends and family may encourage us to become more active in civic and political life. Continue Reading →

Aerial photo of two children eating breakfast with their mother. A fourth plate is set at the table but no one occupies its seat.
Commentary

Democrats and Republicans Should Argue More — Not Less

Daniel A. Cox December 22, 2020

Our survey showed that when our social circles include a more diverse mix of political beliefs, we are more open to argument and less ideologically extreme. And, arguably, the best way to get to this point is to discuss — and disagree about — politics more. Continue Reading →

Survey report

Religious Diversity and Change in American Social Networks: How Our Social Connections Shape Religious Beliefs and Behavior

Daniel A. Cox December 15, 2020

The American Social Network Survey uses a unique design to measure the race, educational background, politics, and religion of our social contacts. The results reveal that personal behavior and beliefs are socially constructed—what we know is influenced by who we know. Americans who have more politically diverse social networks express greater openness to compromise and are less bound to their own beliefs. Racial and ethnic diversity in Americans’ social networks makes one more sensitive to race issues. Continue Reading →

Commentary

Could Social Alienation Among Some Trump Supporters Help Explain Why Polls Underestimated Trump Again?

Daniel A. Cox November 24, 2020

There was a large swing to Trump among white voters who had low levels of social trust — a group that researchers have found is also less likely to participate in telephone surveys. Continue Reading →

Survey Reports

Generation Z and the Transformation of American Adolescence Cover Image

Daniel A. Cox, Kelsey Eyre Hammond, Kyle Gray
November 9, 2023

Generation Z and the Transformation of American Adolescence: How Gen Z’s Formative Experiences Shape Its Politics, Priorities, and Future

This report explores the foundational differences between American generations through their formative adolescent experiences. Continue Reading →

Young man sitting in a dark room before a wall featuring various conspiracy theory-related items illuminated by a computer screen

Daniel A. Cox, M. Anthony Mills, Ian R. Banks, Kelsey Eyre Hammond, Kyle Gray
September 28, 2023

America’s Crisis of Confidence: Rising Mistrust, Conspiracies, and Vaccine Hesitancy After COVID-19

America is experiencing a crosscutting crisis of expertise and scientific distrust accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic that poses significant challenges to democratic debate and public decision-making Continue Reading →

A cartoon showing a vibrant office from the ceiling view.

Daniel A. Cox, Brent Orrell, Kyle Gray, Jessie Wall
September 14, 2023

The Social Workplace: Social Capital, Human Dignity, and Work in America, Volume II

The Social Workplace, Volume II examines Americans’ expectations and experiences surrounding work, the workplace, and key job-related priorities such as pay and interpersonal connections. Continue Reading →

An empty debate stage featuring red and blue podiums below a stage light face an audience of nearly-empty seats.

Daniel A. Cox, Ruy Teixeira
June 29, 2023

The 2024 Presidential Election: Evolving Political Coalitions and Familiar Partisan Divisions

Ahead of the 2024 presidential election, the AEI Survey Center on American Life conducted a national survey of Americans that explored a wide range of political attitudes, current voting preferences, and perceptions of the political parties. Continue Reading →