If you have a lot of friends, you’re probably more active in politics

February 8, 2021 Daniel A. Cox, Jacqueline Clemence

Having a robust network of friends and family may encourage us to become more active in civic and political life.

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Democrats and Republicans should argue more — not less

December 22, 2020 Daniel A. Cox

Our survey showed that when our social circles include a more diverse mix of political beliefs, we are more open to argument and less ideologically extreme. And, arguably, the best way to get to this point is to discuss — and disagree about — politics more.

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Religious diversity and change in American social networks: How our social connections shape religious beliefs and behavior

December 15, 2020 Daniel A. Cox

New analysis explores the degree to which Americans’ religious networks are composed largely of those with similar beliefs and affiliations or those that are more diverse. It also explores how religious diversity among our close personal relationships serves to structure religious behavior and belief.

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Could social alienation among some Trump supporters help explain why polls underestimated Trump again?

November 24, 2020 Daniel A. Cox

There was a large swing to Trump among white voters who had low levels of social trust — a group that researchers have found is also less likely to participate in telephone surveys.

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Biden’s message of unity is welcomed by most Americans

November 13, 2020 Samuel J. Abrams

Biden’s desire to move past the divisiveness that has marked the Trump presidency, the question that follows is simple: Are Americans actually open to working with others and trying to find the middle ground?

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The 2020 election was not primarily about Trump as a person

November 9, 2020 Samuel J. Abrams

Biden will have the challenge of finding common ground with all Americans, but Biden already took the right steps when he declared in his acceptance speech that “It’s time to put away the harsh rhetoric, lower the temperature, see each other again, listen to each other again.”

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For Republicans, abortion attitudes differ depending on the composition of their social circle

October 7, 2020 Daniel A. Cox, Samantha Goldstein

Although abortion attitudes are highly polarized between the two parties and the issue remains contentious, among Republicans, views vary depending on their political networks.

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Democrats and Republicans believe their opponents’ policies threaten the national interest

September 30, 2020 Daniel A. Cox

Lost amid the rhetorical brinksmanship in the fight to replace Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who recently passed after battling pancreatic cancer, is the reason Republicans believe this particular fight is necessary and why Democrats are unlikely to take a measured response.

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Socially distant: How our divided social networks explain our politics

September 30, 2020 Daniel A. Cox, Ryan Streeter, Samuel J. Abrams, Jacqueline Clemence

The American National Social Network Survey is designed to help us understand how the nature of personal networks and relationships conditions personal behavior and influences decisions.

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Survey Reports

Daniel A. Cox
February 11, 2021

After the ballots are counted: Conspiracies, political violence, and American exceptionalism

The January 2021 American Perspectives Survey looks at post-election sentiments, beliefs in conspiracies, attitudes toward political violence, political segregation, and general feelings toward the United States.

Daniel A. Cox
December 15, 2020

Religious diversity and change in American social networks: How our social connections shape religious beliefs and behavior

New analysis explores the degree to which Americans’ religious networks are composed largely of those with similar beliefs and affiliations or those that are more diverse. It also explores how religious diversity among our close personal relationships serves to structure religious behavior and belief.

Daniel A. Cox, Karlyn Bowman
December 9, 2020

A turning point? Americans grapple with COVID-19 amid enduring partisan and racial divisions

The November 2020 APS explores how Americans are grappling with COVID-19 amid soaring numbers of infections, finding that more Americans say they would get a free, FDA-approved vaccine, but large partisan divisions persist. It also challenges the “shy Trump voter” hypothesis, offering possible explanations for Trump’s increased support among non-white voters.   

Daniel A. Cox, Karlyn Bowman, Jacqueline Clemence
November 18, 2020

Hopes and challenges for community and civic life: Perspectives from the nation and Indiana

The coronavirus outbreak has created tensions between urban Americans hit harder by the virus and small towns and rural communities. Despite these disparities, recently released surveys find that before coronavirus, Americans express many of the same ideas and priorities regarding their communities, revealing we may not be as divided as one might think.