A little church on a prairie field as the sun rises over the horizon.
Newsletter

Will the Pandemic Bring About the End of Small Churches?

Daniel A. Cox January 20, 2022

News about religious trends in the US is rarely upbeat. A recent exception was Bob Smietana’s article for Religion News Service in which he documented how declining service attendance has created a new category of “minichurches” that feature fewer members than you might find at a family reunion. But with fewer congregants, religious leaders are able to Continue Reading →

Capitol rioters breeching an entrance to the United States Capitol on January 6th, 2021.
Newsletter

How Much Should We Worry about Political Violence?

Daniel A. Cox January 6, 2022

Last year, Tom Gjelten of NPR asked me what I made of the fact that our poll showed nearly four in ten Republicans appeared to endorse the use of force in politics. I said it was “pretty scary”. A year later, I still feel that way. That 29 percent of Americans, and 39 percent of Republicans, appear ready to Continue Reading →

start and countdown concept. Hand putting wood circle in loading progress bar for countdown year 2021 to 2022.
Newsletter

Charting the Most Important Findings in American Life in 2021

Daniel A. Cox December 23, 2021

To round out the year, I’m sharing my top 10 list of the most revealing and arresting charts documenting changes to American life in 2021. Although many of these are based on our own survey work, we do not have a monopoly on producing insightful charts and compelling visualizations, so I included a few other Continue Reading →

The bar of a coffee shop, including an espresso machine, espresso grinder, and blackboard listing a variety of drink offerings.
Newsletter

Can Coffee Shops Fill in a Void Left When Churches Disappear?

Daniel A. Cox December 9, 2021

As a long-time researcher on religious trends, I’ve spent a good part of my career documenting and discussing the decline of religion in American life. Oftentimes, at the conclusion of a lecture or presentation, I would be met with some combination of consternation and dismay. Then I get the inevitable question: “If religion is going Continue Reading →

An overhead picture of a long, dimly-lit table set for Thanksgiving dinner. People sit at the table.
Newsletter

Yes, You Should Talk Politics with Your Family Over Thanksgiving

Daniel A. Cox November 24, 2021

Every year, the specter of political discord looms over the holidays. But despite the widespread attention it garners, few Americans report fighting over politics at the dinner table. This year, most of us are seeking to strenuously avoid political topics at family get-togethers. This is a mistake. Americans are likely tired of talking about politics. But we should. In Continue Reading →

A black and white image of a running sink tap.
Newsletter

How Unsafe Drinking Water Undermines Public Trust in Government

Daniel A. Cox November 12, 2021

Growing up in Western New York, I have vivid memories of playing outside on hot summer days. My brothers and I would race around our yard, pausing to take a drink from the garden hose. I never thought much about the water I was drinking. Or whether it was safe. It wasn’t until I moved Continue Reading →

An artists rendition of a large-scale futuristic cathedral
Newsletter

Americans Might be Lonelier than Ever, But Mormon Communities Are Thriving

Daniel A. Cox October 28, 2021

It’s difficult to be optimistic about the state of American public life these days. Neighborhoods are being torn apart by politics. We are suffering through a national civic decline, a friendship recession and an epidemic of loneliness. And we’re seemingly angry about everything. And yet, if you ask Americans about life in their own community the situation doesn’t seem quite Continue Reading →

A pair of wedding rings rest on a sandy beach at sunset.
Newsletter

Does Marriage Make Us Happier?

Daniel A. Cox October 14, 2021

Marriage is on the decline. That’s not breaking news, but a new report from the Pew Research Center sheds new light on the magnitude of the drop. In nearly three decades, the number of Americans between the ages of 25 and 54 who are married dropped from over two-thirds to roughly half. Four in 10 (38 percent) Continue Reading →

Chart showing average daily Covid deaths in the U.S. in 2021
Newsletter

Why Increasing COVID-19 Fatalities May Not Sway the Unvaccinated

Daniel A. Cox September 30, 2021

With nearly 700,000 Americans now dead from COVID-19, the US has reached yet another grim milestone. One in five hundred Americans have died from COVID-19. Unvaccinated Americans are suffering the vast majority of serious illnesses and deaths—in fact they are 11 times more likely to die from a COVID-19 infection. And it begs the question: As the unvaccinated see their friends and Continue Reading →

Survey Reports

Generation Z and the Transformation of American Adolescence Cover Image

Daniel A. Cox, Kelsey Eyre Hammond, Kyle Gray
November 9, 2023

Generation Z and the Transformation of American Adolescence: How Gen Z’s Formative Experiences Shape Its Politics, Priorities, and Future

This report explores the foundational differences between American generations through their formative adolescent experiences.

Young man sitting in a dark room before a wall featuring various conspiracy theory-related items illuminated by a computer screen

Daniel A. Cox, M. Anthony Mills, Ian R. Banks, Kelsey Eyre Hammond, Kyle Gray
September 28, 2023

America’s Crisis of Confidence: Rising Mistrust, Conspiracies, and Vaccine Hesitancy After COVID-19

America is experiencing a crosscutting crisis of expertise and scientific distrust accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic that poses significant challenges to democratic debate and public decision-making

A cartoon showing a vibrant office from the ceiling view.

Daniel A. Cox, Brent Orrell, Kyle Gray, Jessie Wall
September 14, 2023

The Social Workplace: Social Capital, Human Dignity, and Work in America, Volume II

The Social Workplace, Volume II examines Americans’ expectations and experiences surrounding work, the workplace, and key job-related priorities such as pay and interpersonal connections.

An empty debate stage featuring red and blue podiums below a stage light face an audience of nearly-empty seats.

Daniel A. Cox, Ruy Teixeira
June 29, 2023

The 2024 Presidential Election: Evolving Political Coalitions and Familiar Partisan Divisions

Ahead of the 2024 presidential election, the AEI Survey Center on American Life conducted a national survey of Americans that explored a wide range of political attitudes, current voting preferences, and perceptions of the political parties.